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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

3 edition of Evolution of polygyny in red-winged blackbirds found in the catalog.

Evolution of polygyny in red-winged blackbirds

Evolution of polygyny in red-winged blackbirds

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Published in 1977 .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Sarah Lenington.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 80937 (Q)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationvii, 101 leaves.
Number of Pages101
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3085402M
LC Control Number82186908

mate choice in birds: a review and experimental test of the "nutritional stress hypothesis." J. Comp. Phys. A Pribil, S., and W. A. Searcy. Experimental confirmation of the polygyny threshold model for red-winged blackbirds. Proceedings of the Royal Society (London) B . Territorial Polygyny in the Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) Talk outline: Introduction Brief history and description of the social system of the red-winged blackbird Male Territoriality Territory defense Competition for territory Site fidelity Territory establishment ** Polygyny Models of territorial polygyny.

Polygyny and sexual selection in red-winged blackbirds. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, [] xviii, pages ; 24 cm (DLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: William A . During the nonbreeding season, red-winged black­ birds are often found in flocks numbering from a few birds to many thousands, sometimes in associ­ ation with other blackbird species and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). In winter, red-winged blackbirds and these associated species gather in roosts occasionally numbering over 10 millionAuthor: George M. Linz, Page E. Klug, Richard A. Dolbeer.

The purpose of this book is to explain why red-winged blackbirds are polygynous and to describe the effects of this mating system on other aspects of the biology of the species. Polygyny is a mating system in which individual males form long-term mating relationships with more than one female at a time. The authors show that females choose to mate. Ken Yasukawa is the author of Animal Behavior ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Polygyny and Sexual Selection in Red-Winged Blackbi.


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Evolution of polygyny in red-winged blackbirds Download PDF EPUB FB2

FIG. The first long-term model of the evolution of polygyny in Red-winged Blackbirds. The starting point is an ancestor whose mating system is territorial monogamy, and the ecological change leading to polygyny is a shift in breeding habitat from terrestrial (woodland/forest) to marsh.

Modified from Searcy and Yasukawa (). The purpose of Polygyny and Sexual Selection in Red-Winged Blackbirds is to explain why red-winged blackbirds are polygynous and to describe the effects of this mating system on other aspects of the biology of the species.

Polygyny is a mating system in which individual males form long-term mating relationships with more than one female at a Range: £ - £ In one model, polygyny evolves from the typical territorial monogamy system of most terrestrial passerines; in the second model, polygyny evolves from a system resembling that of monogamous Agelaius species, with marsh breeding and without male by: Our reconstruction suggests that the closest non-polygynous ancestor of Red-winged Blackbirds was characterized by monogamy, male territoriality, equal sharing of parental care between the sexes, and terrestrial breeding.

Further, polygyny and female-biased care are suggested to have evolved on the same branch as marsh by: Evolution of Polygyny in the Ancestors of Red-Winged Blackbirds; Evolution of Polygyny in the Ancestors of Red-Winged Blackbirds.

William A. Searcy, Ken Yasukawa, Scott Lanyon. Publication Information. Journal: Auk. Volume: Issue: 1 (January-March) Year: The first long-term model of the evolution of polygyny in Red-winged Blackbirds.

The starting point is an ancestor whose mating system is territorial monogamy, and the ecological change leading to. The purpose of this book is to explain why red-winged blackbirds are polygynous and to describe the effects of this mating system on other aspects of the biology of the species.

Polygyny is a mating system in which individual males form long-term mating relationships with more than one female at a time. The purpose of this book is to explain why red-winged blackbirds are polygynous and to describe the effects of this mating system on other aspects of the biology of the species.

Polygyny is a mating system in which individual males form long-term mating relationships with more than one female at a ed on: J Polygyny and sexual selection in red-winged blackbirds by W.A.

Searcy and K. Yasukama Princeton University Press, Monographs in Behavior and Ecology, $/£ hbk, $/£ pbk (xviii + pages) ISBN 0 1Author: S. Lenington. Five hypotheses have been proposed to explain polygyny in the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus).

We categorized the hypotheses into three groups based on female preference for unmated versus monogamously mated males: (1) the “polygyny threshold” model, “sexy son” hypothesis and the “asynchronous settlement” model, which assume that females prefer unmated males to mated Cited by: The red-winged blackbird nests in loose nest is built in cattails, rushes, grasses, sedge, or in alder or willow bushes.

The nest is constructed entirely by the female over the course of three to six days. It is a basket of grasses, sedge, and mosses, lined with mud, and bound to surrounding grasses or branches. It is located cm ( in) to m (14 ft) above : Aves. -The purpose of this book is to explain why red-winged blackbirds are polygynous and to describe the effects of this mating system on other aspects of the biology of the species.

Polygyny is a mating system in which individual males form long-term mating relationships with more than one female at a by: The mating system of red-winged blackbirds is territorial polygyny, a type of polygyny in which the prolonged association between one male and several females occurs on the male’s territory.

As is typical in territorial polygyny, male red-winged blackbirds establish their territories first, and females settle on territories later (for an interesting exception, see Davies ).

Polygyny threshold model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to navigation Jump to search. Polygyny threshold model graph. The polygyny threshold model is an explanation of polygyny, the mating of one male of a species with more than one female. The model shows how females may gain a higher level of biological fitness by mating with a male who already has a mate.

The book probes such phenomena as the begging of nesting birds, alarm calls in squirrels and primates, carotenoid coloration in fish and birds, the calls of frogs and toads, and weapon displays in crustaceans. Do these signals convey accurate information about the signaler, its future behavior, or its environment?Cited by: Picman J () The adaptive value of polygyny in marshnesting Red-winged Blackbirds; renesting, territory tenacity, and mate fidelity of females.

Can J Zool – Google Scholar Rohwer S () The evolution of reliable and unreliable badges of fighting by: search for books and compare prices. Words in title. Author. ISBN. Search. Advanced search. Polygyny and Sexual Selection in Red-winged Blackbirds.

By Ken Yasukawa and William A. Searcy. Price. Store. Arrives. Preparing. Shipping. Red-winged blackbirds: Decision-making and reproductive success By L.D.

Beletsky and G.H. Orians University of Chicago Press, £/$ hbk, £/$ pbk (xxii + pages) ISBN 0 7 / 0 5Author: B.J. Hatchwell. The "polygyny threshold" model, first outlined by G.

Orians incan be viewed as a functional explanation for the maintenance of polygyny in a population by natural selection. Browse North American birds by shape—helpful if you don’t know exactly which type of bird you’ve seen. Orians predicted that animals exhibiting resource defence polygyny would fit to this model when living in successive habitats, where territory quality is very variable.

Using the territory quality to decide whether to pursue a monogamous or polygynous mating relationship. This is shown in the red-winged blackbird by Pribil and Searcy (). Unlike many passerine birds, red-winged blackbirds have a high frequency of polygyny, suggesting a high sexual selection gradient (Beletsky, ), and polygyny in Agelaius-type blackbirds seems to evolve in the context of marsh nesting (Searcy et al., ).Cited by:   Previous work has shown that female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) in Ontario prefer settling with unmated males and that this preference is adaptive because polygynous mating status lowers female reproductive success.

Other evidence suggests that nesting over water increases the reproductive success of female red-winged by: